Talent Sustainability Tip #4: Sustain

Talent SustainmentJust because your employee turnover is low doesn’t mean you shouldn’t worry about your employees. The fact that they didn’t leave you doesn’t mean that they are actually with you. 70% of U.S. workers are disengaged according the State of the American Workplace Report. This tells us that we are not attending to our employees’ human needs. What is sad is that more than one-third of American workers experience chronic work stress, and only 36% say their organization provides sufficient resources to help them manage it. (OnEdge)

If we want to keep our employees both physically and emotionally, we need to take action to attend to their human needs. Here are some ways we can do this:

  1. Hire enough people. Stop overloading employees with more and more work.
  2. Pay them well. If you need them to work more, pay them more or fulfill some other need. They may appreciate having a more flexible schedule or more paid time off. Just ask them.
  3. Invest in an employee well-being program. Make sure they are getting proper exercise, sufficient rest, and the emotional support they need.

These are some examples of what we can do to meet our employees’ human needs—physical, mental, and emotional. Remember, this is the key to effective Talent Management and creating Talent Sustainability in your organization—Because we are simply human beings.™ 

Talent Sustainability Tip # 3: Engage

Employee EngagementA lot of people see employee engagement as something complicated and difficult to accomplish. I see it as something very simple. All we have to do is listen, and by that I mean listen very closely, to our people.  Learn what is important to them, what gets them up each morning, what they value, what drives them.

Now, to bring all this close listening real value, we have to do something with the information! Acknowledge and meet employees’ needs and fuel their drives. In return, we get engagement. When our employees are engaged, they feel appreciated, valued, and free to approach us and to be approached themselves when work issues occur.

One question I am often asked is what to do when you can’t afford to provide all the things employees feel they need.  Well, you do what you can afford to do and you make sure your employees understand your limitations.

Your efforts to accommodate their needs and just the fact that you have taken time to listen makes a tremendous difference in how they feel about you, and that’s exactly what your goal should be. When employees have good feelings about you and your company, they are more willing to stay with you and even go the extra mile.

These are some examples of what we can do to meet our employees’ human needs—physical, mental, and emotional. Remember, this is the key to effective Talent Management and creating Talent Sustainability in your organization—Because we are simply human beings.™ 

Talent Sustainability Tip #2: Empower

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Today’s tip is about empowering our people. The phrase “employee empowerment” has been in the workplace lexicon long enough now to have meanings as varied as the different occupations to which it applies. To me, to empower our employees means to ensure the optimal positive work environment and experience by providing employees the resources needed to be successful in their jobs. 

This means making sure they have:

  • Knowledge, Skills, and Tools. It baffles me when employers hire new staff without providing the essential training they need to do well in their jobs.  Due to the recent business trend of downsizing, many employees have taken new roles that require new skills. Investing in employee training and development not only empowers our employees to be more effective in their jobs, it inspires them to go the extra mile. This is because our efforts in their growth and development make them feel appreciated and valued and, as a result, they feel committed to our company.
  • Emotional Support. Especially after seeing their co-workers’ jobs eliminated, employees need to know that they can count on their bosses for encouragement and moral support. Meet with your employees on a regular basis, even if only for a short period of time. Listen to them; reassure them; praise them.
  • Appropriate Working Environment.  If you can’t work where your employees work, don’t expect them to do well. Attend to their physical needs. Successful employees need essential things such as a complete and comfortable work station, adequate lighting, and a livable temperature. Make sure food and beverages are accessible as needed. Uncomfortable, thirsty and hungry people couldn’t possibly do well at work. Could you?

These are some examples of what we can do to meet our employees’ human needs—physical, mental, and emotional. Remember, this is the key to effective Talent Management and creating Talent Sustainability in your organization—Because we are simply human beings.™